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JBC Bookshelf: A Nod Toward the Past

Monday, September 10, 2012| Permalink
Posted by Naomi Firestone-Teeter

Each of these upcoming books nod toward the past in one way or another,  be it the republication of the first Jewish cookbook in America (original pub year: 1871) and a 1962 classic of German short fiction, a look back at the life of Leonard Cohen, or an exploration of the true story behind a young man's death. While these titles leave much to look forward to, here are a few more titles to be on the lookout out for: Michael Chabon's Telegraph Avenue, Jami Attenberg's The Middlesteins, Shani Boijaniu's The People of Forever Are Not Afraid, Marc Tracy and Franklin Foer's Jewish Jocks, and Amos Oz's Jews and Words.

Speaking of fall delights....JBC's Annual Raid the Shelves event will be on October 10th at JBC HQ. Find more information, including a link for registration, here

Finally, Jewish children's book authors and illustrators should click here to find out more information about the November conference in NYC.


I'm Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen, Sylvie Simmons (September 2012, Ecco) 
A biography of one of the most important and influential songwriters of the past fifty years.

Jewish Cookery Book: On Principles of EconomyEsther Levy (October 2012, Andrews McMeel Publishing)
This was the first Jewish cookbook publishing in America (1871) and it was written to help European immigrants adapt to life in the New World while maintaining their religious heritage.

El Iluminado: A Graphic Novel, Ilan Stavans and Steve Sheinkin (November 2012, Basic Books)

When young Rolando Pérez falls off the cliffs outside Santa Fe, New Mexico, the mysteries begin immediately. Was he pushed or did he jump? What are the documents he’s willing to give his life to protect from his family, the police, and the Catholic Church? Ilan Stavans tries to seek the truth about Rolando and the secret documents that reveal the mysterious sect of crypto-Jews (whose lineage is traced back to the Inquisition, and who still live today, partially concealed, in the American Southwest).

The Jew Car, Franz Fühmann; Isabel Fargo Cole, trans. (December 2012, The University of Chicago Press)
Originally published in 1962, The Jew Car is an examination of the psychology of National Socialism, beginning with childhood anti-Semitism and moving to a youtful embrace—and then an ultimate rejection—of Nazi ideology.





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