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Jewish Book Carnival: September 2014

Monday, September 15, 2014| Permalink

Posted by Naomi Firestone-Teeter

Hosting an early fall Jewish Book Carnival is particularly exciting, as we get to provide you with lots of interesting reads to munch on right before the holidays! In case you're new here, the Jewish Book Carnival is a monthly roundup of some of the great reviews, interviews, and articles about Jewish books and authors from around the web. Find out more information about the series here.

Before we share our colleagues' links, JBC has a few of its own offerings for this month's Carnival:

And now we release you into the hands of our fellow Jewish literary bloggers:

Barbara Krasner at The Whole Megillah focused recently on the Holocaust. She interviewed children's book writer Kathy Kacer, author of Shanghai Escape and the Magician of Auschwitz. She also interviewed The Whispering Town's author Jennifer Elvgren and illustrator Fabio Santomauro.

In September, Jill at Rhapsody in Books reviewed The Garden of Letters by Alyson Richman. This is ultimately a love story that takes place in Italy during World War II, providing a poignant glimpse of what life was like for both Jews and non-Jews in Fascist Italy.

Three delightful links from Behrman House: Robyn Fantich’s Jewish Values Challenge card set review was featured in The Bookjed Digest from The Lookstein Center for Jewish Education. Their favorite videos: Make Prayers by making music can be found here. And from the Behrman House Blog: 8 Icebreakers for the New School Year.

Among the recent treats on Erika Dreifus's My Machberet: a high-schooler's dispatch from the Great Jewish Books Summer Program, Mark Shechner's review of David Shrayer-Petrov's Dinner with Stalin and Other Stories, and a spotlight on Barbara Krasner's new picture book about Golda Meir.

Heidi Estrin at The Book of Life podcast interviews author Jacqueline Jules and illustrator Durga Yael Bernhard creators of the picture book Never Say a Mean Word Again. The story takes place in medieval Spain in the Muslim city of Granada and was inspired by a legend about how the Jewish royal advisor Samuel Ha-Nagid "tore out" a man's angry tongue and gave him a kind one instead. It is a powerful story of conflict resolution, as relevant today as it was centuries ago, and very timely for the High Holidays.

Chaya Rosen, of Art and Writings of Destruction and Repair, discusses writing as a tool of self-transformation with Yael Shahar, the author of A Damaged Mirror. When is story-telling redemptive? What do names have to do with teshuvah—with returning to our better selves? And how does writing bring out the deeper answers to the questions we can't consciously ask?

Michael Felsen shares his article, "A Philosopher’s Take on Jewish History — For Teenagers," published over at The Times of Israel.

Kathe Pinchuck shares two links with us this month:

Find links to the JBC's reviews of titles mentioned in this month's Jewish Book Carnival posts below:




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