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International Read Comics in Public Day

Friday, August 27, 2010 | Permalink

Posted by Dani Crickman

Tomorrow, August 28th, is International Read Comics in Public Day, and we hope you’re as eager to take to the streets, book in hand, as we are. But what to read? While you can always pull out the old Superman comics, there’s a vast wealth of Jewish graphic novels and comic books out there to choose from. In honor of the upcoming holiday, allow us to recommend a few from our bookshelf to get you started.

Market Day by James Sturm (2010)
[Market Day], on the surface, is about a eastern European Jewish craftsman at the dawn of the industrial revolution, struggling to make ends meet and provide for his family the only way he knows how — weaving hand-crafted artisan rugs. It’s a heartbreaking tale, made even more heartbreaking by its relevance to today’s shrinking markets for craftspeople, artists, illustrators, and of course, cartoonists. — Drawn



The Big Kahn by Neil Kleid and Nicholas Cinqueradi (2009)
Rabbi David Kahn dies as a man who has achieved everything he wanted in his life: he has a happy family, a strong congregation, and the love and respect of his entire community. However, on the day of Rabbi Khan’s funeral, a great secret is revealed: David Kahn was really Donnie Dobbs, a petty criminal and conman who lied his way all the way to the top of his profession. — Comics Bulletin



Waltz with Bashir: A Lebanon War Story by Ari Folman and David Polonsky (2008)
Israeli filmmaker Folman and chief illustrator Polonsky’s graphic novel version of their groundbreaking Golden Globe–winning 2008 animated documentary into a graphic novel. Folman’s story is the account of how he came to grips with the repressed memories of the time he was a soldier in the 1982 invasion of Lebanon.



Megillat Esther by JT Waltman (2005)
Impressive is a vast understatement for J.T. Waldman’s undertaking in Megillat Esther, the Hebrew narrative of Queen Esther in ancient times. While other biblical comics will simply retell the tale through text boxes and panels, Waldman makes readers work extensively through this graphic novel so that by the end, one has witnessed a story and a culture. – Curled Up With A Good Book



The Rabbi’s Cat by Joann Sfar (2005)
The preeminent work by one of France’s most celebrated young comic artists, The Rabbi’s Cat tells the wholly unique story of a rabbi, his daughter, and their talking cat — a philosopher brimming with scathing humor and surprising tenderness.




A few other relevant resources:

Happy reading!